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Fit & Finish Fit and Finish = the difference in "good art" and "fine art." Join in, as we discuss the fine art of finish and embellishment.

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  #1  
Old 07-04-2004, 09:34 AM
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Question Best glue

What is the best glue for oily woods such as cocobola ? Thanks in advance.


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Old 07-04-2004, 12:24 PM
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SVanderkolff SVanderkolff is offline
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I have used the devcon 2 ton 24 hour cure with good success but I always cleaned the glue side of the wood well with acetone immidiately before applying the glue.
Hope that helps.
Steve


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Old 07-04-2004, 12:28 PM
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best glue

Appreciate that--I was pondering the use of polyurethane glue if epoxy didn`t do it--Thanks.


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Old 07-05-2004, 01:23 AM
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My personal favorite for gluing anything is Accra-Glass from Brownell's. As long as you clean the surfaces prior to applying it, I don't think theres anything that it won't bond.
The other good points for Accra-Glass versus normal "epoxies" are as follows...
-Accra-Glass is truely water-proof, even the two ton expoy from devcon which claims to be water-proof is not.
-Accra-Glass has a 10 year shelf life, and a 50 year hold life.(meaning that you can have an opened bottle of resin or hardener on your shelf for 10 years and still use it, and once it's mixed/set, it will not begin to break down for 50 years) Devcon type epoxies have a 6 month shelf life (from date of production), and only a 5 year hold life.
- I've experiemented with Accra-Glass by gluing handles on hidden tangs and then once they set up, have taken a hammer to the handle. I can bust the handle materal away, but the wad of Accra-Glass stays on the tang......about the only way to remove it is to either grind it, or burn it off.


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Old 07-05-2004, 02:16 AM
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Wow, that stuff sounds even better then JBweld. What does it look like when it dries, for example on slab handles?


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Old 07-05-2004, 03:07 AM
jwfilion jwfilion is offline
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I agree with Ed. I have been using AcraGlass on guns for years and know its worth. I get mine from Brownells and have used it for knife handles a lot. Just don't add the glass "floss" Lately, I have been using their epoxy called AcraWeld. Works just like ordinary epoxy, but I trust it more.


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  #7  
Old 07-05-2004, 03:22 AM
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Accra-Glass is a slow setting epoxy and it dries clear (or relatively so). I've used it to glass bed rifles and it works pretty well.

Generally speaking, the slower setting the epoxy, the more waterproof it is. Of course, no matter how good the glue is, if water soaks into the wood - or if the metal corrodes - it will not hold. I don't know that Accra-Glass is really any different from any other good slow setting epoxy, but I would not dare to disagree with Ed's judgement.

Polyurethanes are started by having the surfaces wet. That doesn't work easily on metal. They're pretty sticky, and harden well, but I have yet to see a "poly" that cured clear. I've used it for woodworking - for example gluing together boards for a work bench top. Some overflow got on the concrete and set up. Amazing how tough the stuff is.

The glue itself is not as important as the technique of gluing. That is to say that 1) good surface prep (on both surfaces), 2) good mixing of the glue, 3) good, tight, even clamping, and 4) plenty of set-up time. One more thing: seal the wood (or whatever your slabs are made of). Most of the furniture you sit on is held together with some variation of the Elmer's glue that grade school kids use for poster projects. It has a lot more stress than a knife handle (esp. with my butt), but no knifemaker in his right mind would use Elmers. Conversely, I've seen people repair chairs with epoxy - but they fall apart because they didn't apply it correctly.

Superglue may very well be the strongest glue, but it doesn't allow for much thickness. Epoxy and polyurethane have some ability to fill in a thick area. Epoxy dries clear (or can be colored) and is pretty forgiving with respect to the surfaces involved. So pick a good, slow setting epoxy and apply it carefully.


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Old 07-05-2004, 03:53 AM
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hmm im going to have to give that a try..looks good.
what consistentcy is it? bout like devcon? also i saw they said it dries amber..is it a light amber like devcon or darker?

-Jason Aube
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  #9  
Old 07-05-2004, 05:58 AM
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I really appreciate all you all`s input , very useful information -- Thanks , I do have several questions about the Accra-Glass . When using it , if you have over flow--what is the best way to clean it up before it dries and if you miss some over flow--how do you clean it after it dries?Also how does it affect spacing material--such as when you are pressing a handle together and the Accra-Glass squeezez out from between the spacer and handle material . Will it sand down without any problem?
Again -- Thanks in advance.


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Old 07-06-2004, 01:41 AM
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Acetone will clean up epoxy that has not completely set. It's so volatile that you can wipe something off with it and it's pretty much gone.

If I'm mounting wood slabs on a full tang blade without a guard, I finish the portion of the wood that contacts the metal nearest the blade. Partly because that's the only way to get the wood done well and partly so that the wood is sealed and the glue can't get into the wood. Sometimes there's a little overflow to clean up, but it's not too hard. (I find that the little wire brush for the Dremel - which is otherwise pretty useless - works pretty good at stripping out a line of epoxy.) The rest of the wood is sanded and finished after the glue up is done. Any glue overflow around the sides or pins is lost in sanding. On occasion there are large blobs, which I will cut off to save sanding. (Get enough glue there Bubba?)

Actually, you always want some overflow. Otherwise you'll end up with gaps or holes.

Some people mix fine sawdust with the epoxy so that it will have the same color as the wood. I don't do that because I clamp the snot out of my knives to make a very thin glue layer.


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Old 07-06-2004, 06:44 AM
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Jack, if you coat those finished leading edges of the scales with paste wax before you epoxy them to the tang, cleanup is a breeze. Just peels right off.


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  #12  
Old 07-06-2004, 10:19 AM
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I have used a lot of Accra-Glass in the past and it is good stuff for sure, one thing about it make sure that you read and understand the instructions as it will do what thy say it will and another thing that is nice, if you mix too much don't discard it put it in the freezer and when you need some just thaw it out. This is the only epoxy that I have found this will work on, just keep track of the time 15 min. pot time if you use 7 min. you have 7min. left. To get more pot time set the mixing cup in ice water, where I live in Arizona at 100+ deg you have very little pot time. This is why I use a epoxy called 220 which is used by the jewelry industry it is very heat resistant and easy to work with. Gib


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Old 07-06-2004, 01:01 PM
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Has anybody tryed Acraglas Gel?
Is it better than Acraglas 'w/o Gel' ?
Are mixing with 'Atomized Stainless Steel' good or bad regarding strength?


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